Season 5, Episode 2 of the FocusED School Leadership Podcast with Guest Todd Kashdan

Season 5, Episode 2 of the FocusED School Leadership Podcast with Guest Todd Kashdan

Using the Art of Insubordination as a School Leader with Guest Todd Kashdan 

This is Season 5, Episode 2 of FocusED, and it features our guest, Dr. Todd Kashdan. It was originally recorded in front of a live audience in Delaware and provided as a professional development experience in collaboration with the Delaware Department of Education, Wilmington University, and The School House 302. Don’t miss what Dr. Kashdan has to say about The Art of Insubordination, how to be more accepting of divergent ideas, and so much more.

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Dr. Todd Kashdan Brings a Tons of Experience to FocusED Listeners

 

Dr. Todd B. Kashdan, Ph.D., is a Professor of Psychology at George Mason University, a leading authority on well-being, psychological flexibility, curiosity, courage, and resilience. 

He has published over 250 peer-reviewed articles, and his work has been cited over 45,000 times. He received the Distinguished Faculty Member of the Year Award from George Mason University and the Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contributions from the American Psychological Association. 

He is the author of Curious? And The Upside of Your Dark Side, and his latest book is The Art of Insubordination: How to Dissent and Defy Effectively. 

His writing has appeared in the Harvard Business Review, The New York Times, National Geographic, and Fast Company, among other publications, and his research is featured regularly in media outlets such as The Atlantic, The New York Times, NPR, and Time Magazine. 

He’s a twin with twin daughters (plus one more) and has plans to rapidly populate the world with great conversationalists.

 

 

FocusED Show Notes with Dr. Todd Kashdan

The reason that Todd wrote the book is because of the negative connotation that comes with speaking up at work. 

The reason that we want dissension is to make superior decisions. It might be slower and more uncomfortable, but it makes for a better outcome. 

As we open up to dissension, we’re asking people to challenge the status quo. 

Don’t miss what Todd says about conformist thinking and what happens when we don’t provide a platform for diverse thinking. 

Todd brings up the mixed research on diversity and the fact that diverse thinking works better for decision-making, but most organizations don’t have a good way to ensure diversity. 

Listen to what he says about creating meetings and classroom norms to encourage independent thinking. “It takes a modification of the group norms.” 

We were reminded of Liz City’s advice when he talked about collecting information before meetings as a new norm. 

You want to hear what he says about how we have to treat “minorities of one” to make sure that they feel comfortable sharing. “I brought you into this organization because of your unique background.” 

Make sure people know that you respect their views even though you might disagree on everything. 

We want disagreement about topics and issues, not relationships. 

Todd talks about learning to be clear with ourselves and transforming our thinking. What he says about “conviction bias” is fascinating. 

Todd opened up about his background and how all of our backgrounds lend to our biases. “To what degree do you represent the subculture in which you live?” 

The more ways that we can view diversity, the more likely we can bring divergent thinking into the decision-making without thinking of people as “representative” of their group. 

Todd reminds us as educators that one of the ways to deal with misconduct from students is to bring them into the forefront as leaders. The same is true for adults and co-facilitations. 

We have to tell people why we’re amplifying ideas that deserve consideration, especially when they’re divergent. 

Todd wants to improve the student experience in schools by improving their sense of belonging. Don’t miss what he says about distinctiveness. 

Subscribe to Todd’s newsletter. At the end of his newsletter, he posts resources, books, people to follow, and more. 

He mentions Daniel Berlyne on curiosity and aesthetic beauty

Related School Leadership Content Based on This Show

Our interview with Francesca Gino, author of Rebel Talent.

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Thanks for listening to FocusED, an educational leadership podcast brought to you by TheSchoolHouse302 @ dereka206.sg-host.com, where we publish free leadership content. Go to the site, subscribe, and you’ll get all of our content sent directly to your email. 

 

FocusED is your educational leadership podcast where our mission is to dissect a particular focus for teachers and school leaders so that you can learn to lead better and grow faster in your school or district. Let us know who you would like to hear from next. 

Season 5, Episode 1 of the FocusED School Leadership Podcast with Guest Liz City

Season 5, Episode 1 of the FocusED School Leadership Podcast with Guest Liz City

Running More Effective & Efficient Meetings in Schools with Guest Elizabeth City

 

This is Season 5, Episode 1 of FocusED, and it features our guest, Dr. Elizabeth City. It was originally recorded live for a live audience in Delaware and provided as a professional development experience in collaboration with the Delaware Department of Education, Wilmington University, and The School House 302. Don’t miss what Dr. City has to say about her book Meeting Wise, how it leads to a stronger culture in schools, and so much more.

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Dr. Elizabeth City Brings a Tons of Experience to FocusED Listeners

 

Dr. Elizabeth City is a Senior Lecturer on Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE), where she is Executive Director of Reach Every Reader and previously served as Director of the Doctor of Education Leadership (Ed.L.D.) Program. 

Liz has served as a teacher, instructional coach, principal, and consultant, in each role focused on helping all children and the educators who work with them realize their full potential. 

She is currently focused on developing successful readers and strategic leaders in equitable, learning-rich environments. She has authored and co-authored several books for educators, including Meeting Wise, Data Wise, Strategy in Action, Instructional Rounds in Education, Resourceful Leadership, and The Teacher’s Guide to Leading Student-Centered Discussions.

 

 

FocusED Show Notes with Dr. Elizabeth City

Dr. City starts her discussion with the challenges of adults collaborating effectively to support kids. 

She talks about the fact that educators are all pressed for time but that we need to maximize the time we do have. 

Joe asks about a practical tip that leaders can do tomorrow. Liz answers that the agenda for the meeting can be used as a place to start. Don’t miss what she says about adult learning. 

Dr. City tells us that we should shift some of the agenda items at our meetings to collaborative problem-solving. What if one person brings a dilemma, and we use a consultancy protocol? 

Ask this about meetings: Why do we need these people to come together? 

The cycle that she explains is critical to what happens before and after meetings to get the work done. 

Joe asks about the consultancy protocols that Liz talked about. The give-and-get structure is important because everyone learns, and everyone contributes. 

Liz calls for an increase in rigor in schools. “We underestimate what kids can do, and that reflects what we ask them to do.” 

We need tasks that engage the hearts and minds of kids. ~ Dr. Liz City 

Don’t miss the questions that she asks when we’re analyzing a task that we ask students to do. 

  • Exactly what are we asking students to do? 
  • Assuming success on this task, what should we expect students to understand and be able to do? 

Her favorite resource is when we can learn from one another. The profession is too isolated. 

Joe ends by asking what Liz wishes would get more attention. She talks about amplifying the voices that don’t always get heard. Powerful way to end.

 

Related School Leadership Content Based on This Show

Our Podcast with Richard Elmore

From Tinkering to Transformation: How School District Central Offices Drive Equitable Teaching and Learning by Meredith I Honig & Lydia R. Rainey

The Great School Rethink by Rick Hess 

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Thanks for listening to FocusED, an educational leadership podcast brought to you by TheSchoolHouse302 @ dereka206.sg-host.com, where we publish free leadership content. Go to the site, subscribe, and you’ll get all of our content sent directly to your email. 

 

FocusED is your educational leadership podcast where our mission is to dissect a particular focus for teachers and school leaders so that you can learn to lead better and grow faster in your school or district. Let us know who you would like to hear from next. 

Season 4, Episode 14 of the FocusED School Leadership Podcast with Guests Nathan Maynard and Luke Roberts

Season 4, Episode 14 of the FocusED School Leadership Podcast with Guests Nathan Maynard and Luke Roberts

Restorative Justice in Schools with Nathan Maynard and Luke Roberts 

This is Season 4, Episode 14 of FocusED, and it features our guests, Nathan Maynard, and Luke Roberts. It was originally recorded live for a live audience in Delaware and provided as a professional development experience in collaboration with the Delaware Department of Education, the Delaware Academy for School Leadership, and The School House 302. Don’t miss what Nathan and Luke say about restorative justice, school discipline practices, social and emotional learning, school leadership…and so much more.

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Nathan Maynard and Luke Roberts Bring Tons of Experience to FocusED Listeners

Nathan Maynard is a renowned global leader in discipline and restorative practices. He has over 15 years of experience as a facilitator of the work throughout juvenile justice and educational settings.

He co-authored the Washington Post bestseller Hacking School Discipline, which is now an international bestseller in 21 countries. He was awarded as “Youth Worker of the Year” in Indiana. Nathan also is the Co-Founder of Highfive–international restorative practices training group and the first restorative behavior support software for schools. 

Nathan studied Behavioral Neuroscience at Purdue University. He is passionate about ending the school-to-prison pipeline crisis and closing the opportunity gap through implementing cutting-edge trauma-informed and belonging-focused discipline practices.

Dr. Luke first started as an Assistant Researcher in the early 2000s, interviewing over 200 children and young people on their experience of restorative practice; he then went on to become a restorative practitioner working with children at risk of suspension, including those involved in gang violence, and weapon carrying in London. 

This work included multi-agency partnerships with Youth Workers, Police, and Social Services as well as parents. 

His passion for restorative practices has helped in addressing issues of bullying, cyberbullying, and older peer coercion. His work was noticed by the Metropolitan Police, and he was asked to help Police Officers become more empathetic to young people. 

In the 2010s, he then went on to chair the first Young People conference in City Hall, exploring the risks of cyberbullying and online harm, which was led by young people. This work became an All-Party Parliamentary Group, with young people’s voices at the center, to influence politicians. 

He was asked to address youth violence in the prison service and work with the top four prisons of concern in 2015 by using restorative practices. This work left a lasting impression on him, and he developed a range of innovative models to support young people in custody and on release. 

Dr. Luke joined High Five (with Nathan) in 2022, where he brings his passion for championing young people’s voices and experiences with the power to change the system. As Chief Innovation Officer, he finds engaging and exciting ways to equip children with conflict resolution skills as well as future developments for High Five.

 

FocusED Show Notes with Nathan Maynard and Luke Roberts

Nathan started with his definition of restorative practices. Joe underscored the relational aspect of the definition. 

Luke emphasized the process. “If everything is restorative, nothing is restorative.” His question: are we repairing a relationship or building one from scratch? 

Nathan talked about how kids these days don’t respond to fear because they’re just not scared of adults like they used to be. 

Luke brings up a great point: we start with students as “the offender” when we talk about behavior. They’re still students. 

TJ asked a hard question about students and guns in schools. Nathan passes it to Luke lovingly, of course. Luke shifted the conversation from “fear” to “embarrassment.” Students need to claim power by coping with embarrassment…something to help them feel confident. 

Nathan pushed us to reflect on whether or not students are feeling ostracized and whether or not the school and the adults in it are compounding the problem. 

Don’t miss what Nathan says about our role in not glamorizing behaviors. 

One question that comes from the conversation is about the quality of our relationships in schools. What’s the quality of my relationship with [insert a misbehaving student’s name]? 

Luke talked about confirmation bias. Sometimes we look for the things we’ve heard about kids. Story matter. 

We asked Luke about his interviews with students. Here’s what they say: 

  • Am I being treated fairly?
  • Are the adults genuinely caring? Do they care about me? Did they give me time? 

Nathan talks about students needing to be involved for them to feel empowered. Let’s all commit to getting every student involved. This was a critical call to action from the podcast. 

Luke talked about the difference between the content of an experience and the quality of it. 

We asked about resources, books, and people to follow. Luke mentioned that one of the best resources is the internal resources, like adults who work in a school and might be having a conversation for the first time. 

Nathan ended with a question: what does peace look like at our school? 

 

Related School Leadership Content from TheSchoolHouse302

Nathan Maynard on Leading Better & Growing Faster w/ Joe and T.J.

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Thanks for listening to FocusED, an educational leadership podcast brought to you by TheSchoolHouse302 @ dereka206.sg-host.com where we publish free leadership content. Go to the site, subscribe, and you’ll get all of our content sent directly to your email. 

 FocusED is your educational leadership podcast where our mission is to dissect a particular focus for teachers and school leaders so that you can learn to lead better and grow faster in your school or district. Let us know who you would like to hear from next. 

Season 4, Episode 13 of the FocusED School Leadership Podcast with Guest Dwight Carter

Season 4, Episode 13 of the FocusED School Leadership Podcast with Guest Dwight Carter

Learning to “Be Great” with Dwight Carter 

This is Season 4, Episode 13 of FocusED, and it features our guest, Dwight Carter. It was originally recorded live for a virtual audience in Delaware and provided as a professional development experience in collaboration with the Delaware Department of Education, the Delaware Academy for School Leadership, and The School House 302. Don’t miss what Dwight Carter tells us about being great as a school leader, his five principles of leadership…and so much more.

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Dwight Carter Brings Tons of Experience to FocusED Listeners

Dwight Carter is a nationally recognized school leader from Central OH and has been an educator for 27 years. He is currently the Director of Student Support Systems for the Eastland-Fairfield Career and Technical Schools District. 

Here are just a few of his awards and accolades:

 

  • He was inducted into the Jostens Renaissance Educator Hall of Fame. 

 

  • He was named a National Association of Secondary School Principals Digital Principal of the Year

 

  • He was an Academy of Arts and Science Education High School Principal of the Year

 

  • He was the 2015 Ohio Alliance of Black School Educators Principal of the Year

 

  • And he was a 2021 Columbus Afrocentric Early College Sankofa Emerging Leader Award winner. 

 

He is the co-author of three books: What’s In Your Space? Five Steps to Better School and Classroom Design (Corwin, 2015), Leading Schools in Disruptive Times: How to Survive Hyper-change (Corwin 2017), and the second edition of Leading Schools in Disruptive Times (Corwin, 2021).

 

His newest book is Be Great: Five Principles to Improve School Culture from the Inside Out

 

FocusED Show Notes with Dwight Carter

Dwight starts with a simple definition of culture: the accepted behaviors within the organization.

Dwight runs us through the five competencies of school culture. 

  1. Be Grateful 
  2. Be Relational 
  3. Be Enthusiastic 
  4. Be Authentic 
  5. Be teachable 

Joe asks about simple steps that adults can take. Dwight responds with the first principle about gratitude.  

Dwight talks about “what we can control” and brings up the topic of hyper-change. We have total control over our attitudes and actions. 

Don’t miss what Dwight says about the difference between being a “doormat” and a “doorway.”

Dwight reminds us of a Todd Whitaker quote: “When the principal sneezes, everyone catches a cold.” 

What Dwight talks about in terms of “teachable” reminded us of our work in an effort to create learning cultures. 

Don’t miss what he says about the difference between “being judgemental” and “evaluating others.”

Dwight is calling for a shift from teaching to learning–moving from a focus on what teachers are doing to a focus on what students are doing. 

Another shift that Dwight wants to see has to do with assessment and grading. We couldn’t agree more. 

Dwight mentions the book, Because of a Teacher, Volumes One and Two

Dwight highlights the work of his superintendent, Kim Miller, and the book that she has her team reading, The Advantage by Patrick Lencioni.

Dwight wants more to be written about our fear of equity. He tells us that equity is not a zero-sum game. Everyone stands to gain.  

He reminds us of CAT–cope, adjust, and transform. 

Dwight Carter Quotes from FocusED

Be specific when showing gratitude. ~ Dwight Carter

The only two things we can control are our attitude and actions, which requires high levels of self-awareness and self-control. ~ Dwight Carter 

There’s a difference between reacting and responding. ~ Dwight Carter 

To be teachable means the willingness to learn. ~ Dwight Carter 

As an assistant principal, one of your most important jobs is to make your principal’s job easier. The best way to do that is to do your job well. ~ Dwight Carter

You can’t be out-happy, happy. It’s important to be happy in your role. ~ Dwight Carter 

We live in a gray world. There’s nuance to everything. ~ Dwight Carter 

Related School Leadership Content from TheSchoolHouse302

Douglas Reeves Joins Joe and T.J. on the Leading Better & Growing Faster Podcast

Steven Covey Joins Joe and T.J. for a Conversation about Trust

Passionate Leadership

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Thanks for listening to FocusED, an educational leadership podcast brought to you by TheSchoolHouse302 @ dereka206.sg-host.com, where we publish free leadership content. Go to the site, subscribe, and you’ll get all of our content sent directly to your email. 

 FocusED is your educational leadership podcast where our mission is to dissect a particular focus for teachers and school leaders so that you can learn to lead better and grow faster in your school or district. Let us know who you would like to hear from next.

Season 4, Episode 12 of the FocusED School Leadership Podcast with Guest Douglas Reeves

Season 4, Episode 12 of the FocusED School Leadership Podcast with Guest Douglas Reeves

Leading Fearlessly with Dr. Douglas Reeves 

This is Season 4, Episode 12 of FocusED, and it features our guest, Dr. Douglas Reeves. It was originally recorded live for a virtual audience in Delaware and provided as a professional development experience in collaboration with the Delaware Department of Education, the Delaware Academy for School Leadership, and The School House 302. Don’t miss what Dr. Reeves says about leading in fear and how to avoid it, changing old practices (like grading)…and so much more.

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Douglas Reeves Brings Tons of Experience to FocusED Listeners

Dr. Reeves is the author of more than 40 books and more than 100 articles on leadership and education. He has twice been named to the Harvard University Distinguished Authors Series and was named the Brock International Laureate for his contributions to education. 

His career of work in professional learning led to the Contribution to the Field Award from the National Staff Development Council, now Learning Forward. Doug has worked in 50 states and more than 40 countries. His volunteer activities include FinishTheDissertation.org, providing free and non-commercial support for doctoral students, and The SNAFU Review, publishing the essays, poetry, stories, and artwork of disabled veterans. 

Doug lives in Boston. He Tweets @DouglasReeves, blogs at CreativeLeadership.net, and can be reached at 1.781.710.9633.

FocusED Show Notes with Dr. Douglas Reeves

We started with the concept of fear. Why so much fear in schools? Dr. Reeves makes it simple: if the only people talking are the ones who are volunteering or in charge, then we have a fear-filled environment. 

Joe highlights what Dr. Reeves says in the book about special education. Doug riffs on the fact that special education practices are just good teaching practices. 

One focus of the podcast was all about the need to take risks and not get things right the first time. 

T.J. asked Doug to talk about candor in schools and its importance of it. 

Joe mentions Atul Gawande’s video about feedback. Dr. Reeves follows up with the words of Howard Gardner and Richard Elmore and their sentiment about thinning–I used to think, and I don’t think anymore. 

You don’t want to miss what Doug says about “promises-made and promises-kept.” 

He talked about credibility and the strategies we can use to build our own credibility. 

What he says about decision-making and options is powerful. 

Doug mentioned Daniel Kahneman’s “sunk cost fallacy.” 

We asked Doug what would improve the student experience in every school, and he talked about grading and the use of the average. 

He calls for more non-fiction writing in all subjects. 

Doug mentions a book he read last week that he calls “the single best book on student discipline.” Changeable by Stuart Ablon

Joe asked about remembering facts and applying what you read, and Dr. Reeves promotes Zotero as a personal assistant of sorts.  

Doug gives some suggestions about how to use ChatGPT for secondary schools. The one we liked the best was to require ChatGPT as a first draft and then improve it through the revision process. 

Don’t miss what Dr. Reeves says about making a local impact with his work and measuring that.

Doug has a call to action for daily support for new teachers and the need for all of us to share as much as we can with each other about the difference that we all make as educators. 

Douglas Reeves Quotes from FocusED

When kids are afraid, they can’t learn. When adults are afraid, they can’t learn. ~ Dr. Douglas Reeves 

One of the biggest misunderstandings is that we build self-esteem with blanket affirmations. Not true. We need candor instead. ~ Dr. Douglas Reeves 

We have to quit doing what we’ve always done and expecting different results. ~ Dr. Douglas Reeves  

Related School Leadership Content from TheSchoolHouse302

Douglas Reeves Joins Joe and T.J. on the Leading Better & Growing Faster Podcast

Steven Covey Joins Joe and T.J. for a Conversation about Trust

Passionate Leadership

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Thanks for listening to FocusED, an educational leadership podcast brought to you by TheSchoolHouse302 @ dereka206.sg-host.com where we publish free leadership content. Go to the site, subscribe, and you’ll get all of our content sent directly to your email. 

 

FocusED is your educational leadership podcast where our mission is to dissect a particular focus for teachers and school leaders so that you can learn to lead better and grow faster in your school or district. Let us know who you would like to hear from next.

Season 4, Episode 11 of the FocusED School Leadership Podcast with Laurie Barron

Season 4, Episode 11 of the FocusED School Leadership Podcast with Laurie Barron

Strengthening School & District Communities with Laurie Barron

This is Season 4, Episode 11 of FocusED, and it features our guest, Laurie Barron. It was originally recorded live for a virtual audience in Delaware and provided as a professional development experience in collaboration with the Delaware Department of Education, the Delaware Academy for School Leadership, and The School House 302. Don’t miss what Laurie says about strengthening school and district communities as a teacher and leader…and so much more.

 

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Laurie Barron Brings Tons of Experience to FocusED Listeners

Dr. Laurie Barron is in her twenty-seventh year in education, serving as a high school English teacher, a middle school assistant principal, and nine years as a middle school principal.  

Since 2013, she has served as the superintendent of the Evergreen School District in Kalispell, Montana. Barron holds a bachelors in English Education from the University of Georgia, a master’s in Supervision and Administration from the University of West Georgia, and a doctorate in Educational Leadership from the University of Sarasota.  

The following are just some of her accolades:

  • National Superintendent Certification through AASA
  • National Board Certified Teacher
  • Teacher of the Year
  • STAR Teacher
  • Georgia Middle School Principal of the Year
  • National Middle School Principal of the Year 
  • School Administrators of Montana G.V. Erickson Award
  • Empowered Superintendent of the Year by the Montana Educational Technologists Association
  • Montana Superintendent of the Year

She has co-authored 3 books: 

Dr. Barron is a national speaker, consultant, and leadership coach, and she says she’s living the dream in northwest Montana with her husband Daniel, where together they enjoy spending time with family watching Georgia Bulldogs football, snow skiing, camping, rafting, hiking, and watching their daughter Emma play college soccer.

FocusED Show Notes with Laurie Barron

Laurie started out the conversation with the fact that the concept of instructional leadership may have confused us during NCLB into forgetting about the whole child. Her book brings that back to the center of the conversation with a sense of belonging. 

Joe asks Laurie to get granular about strategies for helping students understand and feel that they matter in school. Her response: Trusting relationships are the biggest key.

Laurie breaks down a timeline for engagement: 

  • Every classroom door, every morning. 
  • Every classroom was visited every week. 
  • Feedback to every teacher every month.
  • Twice a year check-ins with every direct report. 

Dr. Barron talked about earning the credibility to give teachers ideas that they’ll use. Part of it comes from visibility; the other part comes from our ability to have tough conversations.

Laurie talked about the level of accountability that comes from having crucial conversations. Timing is everything. 

Laurie talked about the myth that holding high standards will push people out. She says that we might need to “love harder” and “explain more.” 

The best advice that Laurie has for leaders is to develop a network. Wisdom from her mentor: Keep one foot in your job and one foot in your profession

Laurie recommends What Great Teachers Do Differently by Todd Whitaker 

Joe asks about books outside of education. Laurie mentions Mindset by Carol Dwek and Daniel’s Pink’s Drive. Must read!

Laurie Barron Quotes from FocusED

It’s really hard to engage and participate if you feel like you don’t matter. ~ Laurie Barron 

Honesty is kind. We need to give very clear feedback to teachers. ~ Laurie Barron 

How we work with people and our honesty with them are critical. ~ Laurie Barron

More School Culture Resources from TheSchoolHouse302

3 Ideas About Innovative School Culture

5 Ways to Show More Support to Create the School Culture that Teachers and Students Need

Retention for a Change

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Thanks for listening to FocusED, an educational leadership podcast brought to you by TheSchoolHouse302 @ dereka206.sg-host.com where we publish free leadership content. Go to the site, subscribe, and you’ll get all of our content sent directly to your email. 

 

FocusED is your educational leadership podcast where our mission is to dissect a particular focus for teachers and school leaders so that you can learn to lead better and grow faster in your school or district. Let us know who you would like to hear from next.