6 Ways that We Should Think About Student Engagement in the 2021-2022 School Year Because of What We Learned During the Pandemic

6 Ways that We Should Think About Student Engagement in the 2021-2022 School Year Because of What We Learned During the Pandemic

Leading within a Disruptive Environment

The last 18 months have brought nothing but disruption to schools and the students they serve. And although there have been many hardships and catastrophes yet to come, we believe that the crisis strengthened education as a profession and provided all educators, from the classroom to the principal’s office with abundant opportunities for growth. 

When we think about leading during a crisis, we typically picture leaders in two opposing vantage points. On one hand, a crisis can paralyze people. The pressure of any conflict can cause a chemical reaction in the brain and bloodstream that produces the flight or fight response in humans. This can cause uncertainty, fear, and even panic. It slows things down to a dark helplessness. 

But that response is not inevitable nor is it unavoidable. In Becoming Bulletproof, Evy Poumpuras, describes how she and her United States Secret Service colleagues responded, in real time, to the harrowing attacks on the North and South towers of the World Trade Center. She details how their training kicked in and took over. Trained leaders–those who have had practice in crisis situations or who have gone through serious leadership programs–learn to capitalize on a crisis and it’s possible outcomes. The CDC names several positive reactions dependent on effective management and communication, including a “sense of strength and empowerment,” “new resources and skills,” “renewed sense of community,” and “opportunities for growth.”  

When leading within a disruptive environment, the greatest leaders choose to use the situation as an opportunity for growth for themselves and their team. ~ @TSH302

 

The problem is that although our best leaders choose growth and renewal as outcomes of a crisis, the worst choose to blame and to create distrust and a false sense of safety as they try to “return to normal.” The truth is that crises precipitate change, and every leader’s job is to embrace new developments, innovation, and transformation. 

John Hattie Reveals the Learning Loss Fallacy 

As educators look to move forward in the wake of a post-vaccinated society, there are several issues to face–from social and emotional trauma to the learning needs of our students. “Learning loss” is definitely the new buzz in education, but let’s take a closer look. We had the distinct pleasure in attending and presenting at this year’s Annual Visible Learning Conference. It is always awesome to watch Dr. Hattie as he presents new data, sometimes shocking his audience with revelations about how students learn and how teachers should prepare their lessons. 

John was pleased to note that there are already meta-analyses that apply statistical tests to the effects of learning during the pandemic. In particular focus is the idea that students lost some or much of the learning that would have taken place if they had been in school. From what John showed during his presentation, it’s simply not true. In the aggregate, the greatest losses are in writing, not reading or math. And, some students made gains, especially in math. 

Hattie had a great deal to say about why students aren’t showing the losses that everyone expects, including the amount of online math practice that students experienced versus watching teachers model problem solving in the classroom. This is not to say that we don’t have students who missed opportunities to learn. It simply means that we need to diagnose learning loss, not assume it. And it also means that there were a number of practices that improved, some of which improved learning outcomes for students. 

We find this data to be encouraging. It demands a level of precision as we approach the school year, more personalized than generalized. We do know that the pandemic adversely impacted low-income areas and communities of color worse than other demographic groups. Coupled with 1.2 million fewer students in the public education system, our strategies below are designed to prioritize learning needs, target key classroom practices, and provide support for all students. We picked 6 practices that we believe all schools should focus upon for growth and renewal in the upcoming months as we return to whatever format of learning we’re expected to implement. 

6 Classroom Practices that Need to Change and Why

 

Grading and Assessment Practices Have to Continue to Evolve 

Grading and assessment practices, from policy to classroom structures, are maybe the single most controversial topic in education today. Prior to the pandemic, the evolution of grading improvements was moving along at a snail’s pace. Now, more educators are rethinking grading than ever before, and that has to be a focus for all schools. Ultimately, the 100-point scale and averaging are two of the biggest problems with how we calculate grades, but small changes in the way we look at assessment practices can make all the difference in supporting learning. 

Two grading and assessment books to consider reading as a school community: 

Grading for Equity by Joe Feldman

Assessing with Respect by Starr Sackstein (listen to our podcast interview with Starr here)

Student Discourse Has to to be Top Priority 

The more students are able to talk in class and engage in reasoning aloud, the better they perform on content areas assessments. We need our students to get more of the air time in the classroom than have traditionally been granted. The average teacher talks anywhere between 60 and 70 percent of the time allotted for learning in the classroom. It’s also startling to think that during this talk-time, teachers ask between 200 and 300 questions a day, most of which are clerical and clarifying in nature. Student discourse and creative communication have to be a top priority for every teacher and every school leader. We can promote more talk time by instituting specific strategies that help with it and by tracking how often students get to talk and the types of questions with which they engage. 

We recommend TeachFX as a classroom talk-time tracking tool. 

Check out TeachFX if you don’t know about the tool already. Make sure to tell them that we sent you. (Disclaimer: we don’t make any money from our recommendation of this product; if we did, you would know it).

Learning Management Systems Need to Stay Organized 

When we plunged into remote learning, asynchronous time, and the virtual classroom, we saw right away that alignment across systems in the use and structures of a learning management system (LMS) were inconsistent. In some schools, not every teacher was using the available LMS, in some districts the LMS wasn’t consistent from K-12, and some teachers didn’t even have access to use one. We don’t have an LMS recommendation, but we do strongly recommend that schools develop clear expectations for how the LMS is used by every teacher. When students enter the LMS, the setup should be logical and coherent, and this should be true from course-to-course and teacher-to-teacher. Gone are the days when we can do classroom walkthroughs without also doing gradebook and LMS walkthroughs to accompany them, providing teachers with candid and compassionate feedback about the improvements we expect them to make. 

Evidence of Learning is the Key to Professional Learning Communities 

With assessment practices, including the alignment of course-by-course tests and projects, and a congruous use of a learning management system at the forefront of our thinking this fall, we should be able to use the evidence of our students’ learning to drive conversations in PLCs better than ever before. This means that we can use data to support lesson planning along with an item analysis of the standards that students are meeting and not meeting.  We appreciate the model below from Broward County Schools, which encapsulates the elements of effective PLCs. 

 

The best PLC book for school leaders.

Tons of books have been written about PLCs but none are as powerful as Leaders of Learning by Richard DuFour and Robert Marzano. If you don’t have this book on your shelf, buy it today. 

Teacher Reflection and Strategy Implementation Can Be Faster

Teacher reflection and strategy implementation can be faster than we thought prior to the pandemic and shouldn’t slow back down as we enter a new era in education. Teachers were forced to try many different ways to connect with students, and the growth that educators experienced during the pandemic was down right impressive. From teachers mastering Flipgrid to the use of Google Classroom, there was a necessity to explore and try new strategies and tools that resulted in positive changes to the way students engaged with content. This freedom to explore and the speed at which educators shared new ideas accelerated teacher development. Through practice and reflection, a learning culture emerged whereby teachers didn’t hesitate to try something new and then reflect versus our old model of reflect-first-then-shift. The reality is that we should be trying new strategies all the time, and we hope that this cultural shift continues in a supportive and constructive environment where risk-taking is rewarded. 

Reflective teaching is a key component of a learning culture in schools. 

Take a look at David Kolb’s learning cycle, depicted wll by Cambridge Assessment International Education. In the menu bar, notice “Reflective practice in practice” and “Checklist,” both game changers!

Learning Is Social and Emotional 

Classrooms are incredibly complex. Embracing the learner’s experience complicates teaching, but it’s a necessary aspect of a quality learning environment and one that the pandemic made abundantly clear. There must be a balance between the curriculum, as to what must get taught, and ensuring that the students actually learned. This requires teachers to be nimble with how to teach but still laser focused on teaching all the key learning targets. It’s unfortunately easy to think that adding social and emotional learning (SEL) into the classroom is daunting and one more thing for teachers to do. However, without the social and emotional side of teaching, learning and retention are less likely to take place. The key to understanding the power of using social and emotional practices in the classroom is in the realization that learning is social and emotional. Without the social aspect of the classroom and the emotional regulation it takes to engage, all the “teaching” in the world won’t stick. 

For a great resource on SEL, visit the CASEL site. It provides a litany of resources, like their Guide to Schoolwide Social and Emotional Learning.

 

The Buy-In Myth that We Find within Our Circle of Nice in Schools

As leaders work to change culture, using any of these 6 practices–from grading to running a proper PLC–as an example, we see that conflict arises. The definition of leadership is influence, the challenge of leadership is conflict, and the result of leadership is change. You can’t have change without some level of conflict, and conflict is not always unhealthy. We close this blog with three major sentiments that prove helpful when trying to make a change within an established culture. 

  1. Patrick Lencioni reminds us that the healthiest organizations are not democratic. The leader sets the vision, communicates the change, and pushes the work forward. 
  2. Trust is often counterintuitive. Leading through relationships doesn’t require a “culture of nice” in schools. Setting clear expectations, holding everyone accountable, and confronting reality are as important for trust as supporting the people where they are. In fact, support without a level of pressure results in the status quo. Just remember that pressure without support is unfair. 
  3. We learned from Douglas Reeves that “buy-in” is a myth. Buy-in occurs after you’ve made a change, not before. It’s unlikely that any of these 6 practices will be agreed upon and implemented by your entire staff without pushback of some kind. You don’t need everyone to believe in the beginning for a deep change to occur over time. 

Don’t hesitate to reach out for support in making these 6 changes in your school. We hope that the resources here and the ones to come this month will make a difference for you. Register for our Fireside Chat on this topic by clicking the link to receive your Zoom code

Stay tuned for more nuggets of wisdom, podcasts, books to read, and the best resources for leading better and growing faster in schools. Follow us at theschoolhouse302.com to join thousands of leaders who get our content each month. Send this to a friend. 

As always, let us know what you think of this with a like, a follow, or a comment. Find us on Twitter, YouTube, iTunes, Facebook, & SoundCloud. And, again, if you want one simple model for leading better and growing faster per month, follow this blog by entering your email at the top right of the screen.

TheSchoolHouse302 is about getting to simple by maximizing effective research-based strategies that empower individuals to lead better and grow faster.

Joe & T.J. 

302 Thoughts Fireside Chat: ESSER Spending 101: Invest in Your People for Sustainable Growth & Greater Student Achievement

302 Thoughts Fireside Chat: ESSER Spending 101: Invest in Your People for Sustainable Growth & Greater Student Achievement

The Trifecta for Educational ESSER Spending

Education is a people business–a community built on the premise that through excellence in teaching and learning students can and will learn. However, the road to learning is fraught with ups, downs, obstacles, and challenges. No one expected the tumult of Covid19. The path that we were on was shut down, and educators had to find a whole new route. We commend teachers, support staff, and school leaders for pivoting quickly and working tirelessly to educate students. But, we’re just getting started. 

Now, months after the pandemic first hit, in an industry completely disrupted and upended, we find ourselves with an influx of money to help students in an accelerated fashion and to minimize the devastating impact of the pandemic. The big question looming is how best to spend our new ESSER funds?

For us at TheSchoolHouse302, we go back to where the greatest impact lies and that’s with people. Investing in our people first, developing their capacity, helping and enabling them to learn and grow so that they are better equipped, is the key to success. Below, you’ll find our model for investing in people–pay the people, get them what they need to be successful, and develop them as experts in their domain. We need to retool our thinking around money and how we use it. One tip for that is to consider that our staff are builders–builders of the future by teaching our students, supporting them socially and emotionally, and offering them unique learning experiences.

This is what we call a learning culture, and it’s why principals who want to build a learning culture need to think about all of their pots of money in these three primary buckets. This culture doesn’t just happen, though; it is a concerted effort to empower our teachers–as expert builders–for a sustainable and productive future. The alternative is to spend the money–new and old–on contractors, shiny new programs, and other stuff that simply goes away when the money runs out. 

 

Critical Ideas from our 302 Thoughts: Capacity Driven Investments

Administrators must ask, what investments will yield the highest returns? When considering staff members, be sure to have a 360° view, including administrators, instructional staff, support staff, and non-Instructional personnel. Schools need an all hands-on-deck approach, which we describe in great detail in our book, Passionate Leadership

Professional learning should be dynamic, not only focused on equipping the educator with skills, but also diving deep into self-care and ways they can fill their own cup each day. There should also be a clear distinction between training and professional learning. There are incredible products that can definitely help students learn and assist teachers in the classroom. But, consider services and products that help staff to learn beyond training them to use a new tool–a new way to rejuvenate and get better at the work, now and into the future. We think highly of the following purchases that school leaders might make with ESSER funds because we believe that they can be impactful as we ask ourselves this critical question: what investments will yield the most sustainable returns? 

    • Great educators are lifelong learners, but that doesn’t mean that they have had access to some of the most impactful experiences for lifelong learning, including a mastermind group designed to lead better. Check out Danny Bauer’s mastermind, Better Leaders Better Schools, and join a group. Also, get his new book and don’t miss our review of it
    • An investment that we find captivating since it solves so many common problems in the classroom is Organized Binder. Organization, goal setting, productivity, and more are all skills, and as we seek to address unfinished learning, we need our students to be organized and ready for what we put in front of them. 
    • We also dug into what is called the fitbit of education, TeachFX. Great teachers design lessons where the learners are the ones who are working the hardest within the classroom, not the teacher. Put simply, TeachFX measures teacher talk versus student talk. Check it out. 
    • It wouldn’t be an episode of 302 Thoughts without a book recommendation or two. We simply can’t ignore the expansive research found in neuroscience and how that impacts the classroom. As much as Joe tried not to mention a particular book, three titles were dropped quick:

One thing we learned after No Child Left Behind is that money is not the answer for sustainable outcomes if not used wisely. In fact, hiring more personnel and filling voids can lead to unwanted vacancies in just a couple short years. Invest in your people, help them develop and grow by asking them what they need and want. They are the professionals in the classroom and can provide tremendous insight. 

Join Us for the Next Live Session of 302 Thoughts 

This was our first live 302 Thoughts and we were thrilled with the turn out and look forward to our next episode on August 11th at 7:30 EST. We are going to be talking about leadership during such a disruptive period and how to re-engage students as they return to in-person learning. Register here. 

We can’t wait to hear from you. 

Joe & T.J.

 

 

PS — If you have a topic you want us to cover or need recommendations on books to read in a particular area of leadership, just send us a tweet or an email. 

This episode was brought to you by GhostBed, a family-owned business of sleep experts with 20+ years of experience. With 30K+ 5-star reviews, you can’t go wrong with GhostBed. Their mattresses are handcrafted, and they come with a 101-night-at-home-sleep trial. For a limited time, you can get 30% by using our code — SH302 — at checkout. And, even if you tell someone about GhostBed, you can earn a $100 referral reward. Go to Ghostbed.com today and use SH302 at checkout. 

 

 

Dear DE School Leaders, 

We hope all is well with you. 

This week, our friends at TheSchoolHouse302 are hosting a live event, much like their FocusED podcast, where they’ll be live for a conversation about school funding. They will be available for questions after about a 20 minute recorded chat. The topics covered this month: funding 101 for principals, including a framework for thinking about spending, how ESSER money should support capacity, and a product review of some of their favorite services and solutions right now. 

We hope you can join us on Wednesday at 7:30PM EST. The registration information is below. Bring a friend. 

302 Thoughts Fireside Chat — School Funding for Principals — Live Event — July 14th @ 7:30PM EST

July — Spending/budgeting/ESER funds — Danny Bauer

TeachFX 

Organized Binder 

August — Post-pandemic student engagement 

Differentiation is the king — Dwight Carter 

Each one is a bit redefined for users, like differentiation is really about outcomes

Grading 

Sept. — The 10 surefire ways to build an SEL-focused school culture — 

Taking Social-Emotional Learning Schoolwide: The Formative Five Success Skills for Students and Staff

by Thomas R. Hoerr

Oct — Richard Shell — 5 tips for amplifying your ambitious goals so that they are unstoppable 

Conscious Code: Lead with Your Values. Advance Your Career 

Extracurricular

http://www.ascd.org/Publications/Educational-Leadership/Write-for-Educational-Leadership/Write-for-Educational-Leadership.aspx

Feedback for Impact

As the late Grant Wiggins wrote, “less teaching plus more feedback is the key to achieving greater learning.” This is as true for educators as it is for the students we work with. In this issue, we will explore the key characteristics of effective, actionable feedback—whether provided in the classroom, following a teacher observation, or during a coaching conversation—and how schools can create cultures of effective feedback and make the most of feedback for growth. Articles will look at feedback protocols and routines; evidence-based formative assessment strategies; best practices for differentiating and delivering feedback; and how to make feedback stick.

Submit a manuscript for this issue.

Deadline: November 1, 2021

Season 2, Episode 1 of FocusED with Jonathan Alsheimer #FocusED

Season 2, Episode 1 of FocusED with Jonathan Alsheimer #FocusED

Next Level Teaching with FocusED Guest Jonathan Alsheimer 

This is Season 2, Episode 1 of FocusED, and it features guest, Jonathan Alsheimer. It was originally recorded live for a studio audience in Delaware, provided as a professional development experience for Delaware teachers and leaders. Don’t miss what Jonathan has to say about taking teaching to the next level in every classroom in your school.  

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Jonathan Alsheimer Brings Tons of Experience to FocusED Listeners

Jonathan Alsheimer is the unorthodox, energetic, and entertaining middle school teacher who refuses to live a life of limitations. Jonathan is often referred to as “my favorite teacher” by his students, and he’s the author of NEXT LEVEL TEACHING.

As a passionate educator and National Keynote Speaker, Jonathan Alsheimer presents on the idea limitless possibilities for teachers as a driving force and the impact of an infectious classroom and school culture. NEXT LEVEL TEACHING is about every teacher bringing their unique flair to better their school every single day, always reaching for the NEXT LEVEL.

Jonathan, teaches at the world-renowned Fred Lynn Middle School, which was featured in two documentaries “Relentless” and “Relentless: Chasing Accreditation.” He has been featured as the teacher who forged a partnership with UFC Fighter and light-weight contender Paul Felder to bring the message that students should never give up, fighting for their education, and empowering them to believe in themselves, all principles that Jonathan promotes in his classroom.

As Jonathan always says, “Game-changing is not a cliche motto; it is a way of life… some talk about it while others live by it!”

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Thanks for listening to FocusED, an educational leadership podcast brought to you by TheSchoolHouse302 @ theschoolhouse302.com where we publish free leadership content. Go to the site, subscribe, and you’ll get all of our content sent directly to your email. 

FocusED is your educational leadership podcast where our mission is to dissect a particular focus for teachers and school leaders so that you can learn to lead better and grow faster in your school or district with more knowledge, better understanding, and clear direction on what to do next. 

This episode was brought to you by GhostBed, a family-owned business of sleep experts with 20+ years of experience. With 30K+ 5-star reviews, you can’t go wrong with GhostBed. Their mattresses are handcrafted, and they come with a 101-night-at-home-sleep trial. For a limited time, you can get 30% by using our code — SH302 — at checkout. And, even if you tell someone about GhostBed, you can earn a $100 referral reward. Go to Ghostbed.com today and use SH302 at checkout. 



Read This To Unveil the Impact of Masterminds and the Exponential Growth You Can Experience as a School Leader

Read This To Unveil the Impact of Masterminds and the Exponential Growth You Can Experience as a School Leader

Don’t miss this vblog on YouTube or catch our Read This segment of our One Thing Series podcast–books you need to read to lead better and grow faster.

Featured Author: Danny Bauer

Featured Books: Mastermind: Unlocking Talent Within Every School Leader

Why We Love This Book for School Leaders

We’ll say it up front and just get it out of the way, Danny is a friend of TheSchoolHouse302, and we are thrilled about his new book. You might say we are biased, and that is impacting our review. Honestly, we would agree 100%. But only because we curate authors as often as we curate books, and Danny’s last book was a hit with us as well.

We carefully select what we read at this point, and each page that we turn is with the expectation that we will learn something new to apply in our roles. This book achieves that for us with a twist. As Bauer quickly writes in the beginning of his book, Masterminds are not a new way to develop leaders. In fact, we first read about the concept of a Mastermind in Napoleon Hill’s classic, Think and Grow Rich. Before we go on, if you have not read Think and Grow Rich, pause right now and buy it. Don’t let the title fool you. The riches Hill describes are far beyond material wealth and include what many educators truly desire–making a difference for the betterment of this world.

Back to Danny’s new book. Here’s why we consider this book a must read:

  1. Danny tackles several taboos that limit our growth as school leaders.
  2. The book uncovers the A, B, & C of successful professional learning.
  3. It is written almost as a testimony to how Masterminds have changed leaders for the better. The case studies are fantastic.
  4. The book dives into the power of emotional intelligence, which is needed now more than ever.

A Better School Leader

To be a great leader we have to be willing to venture out and experience learning in new and different ways that can stretch and challenge our thinking. Reading is a great way to do that if you build a system to implement what you read. Another great way is to join a community of individuals who don’t want to be average leaders and who truly want to do something great for their community. 

The second best thing you can do right now is to take the time to learn about the power of masterminds and how they can transform and unlock your thinking. The first best thing you can do is to enroll yourself today. 

Let us know what you’re reading by contacting us at contact@theschoolhouse302.com.

We can’t wait to hear from you. 

Joe & T.J.

PS — If you have a topic you want us to cover or need recommendations on books to read in a particular area of leadership, just send us a tweet or an email. 

This episode was brought to you by GhostBed, a family-owned business of sleep experts with 20+ years of experience. With 30K+ 5-star reviews, you can’t go wrong with GhostBed. Their mattresses are handcrafted, and they come with a 101-night-at-home-sleep trial. For a limited time, you can get 30% by using our code — SH302 — at checkout. And, even if you tell someone about GhostBed, you can earn a $100 referral reward. Go to Ghostbed.com today and use SH302 at checkout.

What Every Principal Leader Ought to Know About Personal Development and the Power of A Mastermind Group

What Every Principal Leader Ought to Know About Personal Development and the Power of A Mastermind Group

Learn more about Danny Bauer

Daniel Bauer is an unorthodox Ruckus Maker who has mentored thousands of school leaders through his Better Leaders Better Schools blog, books, podcasts, and powerful coaching experiences. 

His new book, The Mastermind: Unlocking the Talent Within Every School Leader introduces a proprietary process called the ABCs of powerful professional development™ which is changing the landscape of how school leaders experience professional development. 

Key Thoughts from Our Interview with Danny Bauer

  • Danny wastes no time about the harsh reality that 90% of school leaders who leave their school, leave the profession. The cost of retention is too high, which is why joining a community of dedicated professionals is paramount.
  • Listen to Danny explore the imposter syndrome, how it limits our abilities, why it kicks in, and how we can push past our self-defeating behaviors when we are a part of the right community.
  • Danny shares a quote: What’s ordinary for you is extraordinary for me. ~ Derek Sivers. Check out entrepreneur and founder of CD Baby, Derek Sivers, you won’t be disappointed.
  • A big part of the Mastermind process is the “hotseat” protocol. It’s where we challenge one another to do and be better. Listen to what Danny says about the collective IQ. 
  • What is Danny looking forward to? Eventually, he wants to serve 1200+ leaders in his Mastermind. This is where the interview gets very tangible, since Danny tells about what he learned from The Strangest Secret by Earl Nightingale.
  • Teaching others is what leads to his growth because it helps to make the learning stick. He is always looking for something that stretches his thinking. Check out the AltMBA, an investment that he made in his own leadership. 
  • Lastly, listen to what he says about “just cause.”

Let us know what you’re reading and who else you want us to bring on the show by contacting us at contact@theschoolhouse302.com

We can’t wait to hear from you. 

Joe & T.J.

Season 1, Episode 9 of FocusED with Don Wettrick #FocusED

Season 1, Episode 9 of FocusED with Don Wettrick #FocusED

Innovation and 20% Time in Schools w/ Guest Don Wettrick 

This is Season 1, Episode 9 of FocusED, and it features guest, Don Wettrick. It was originally recorded live for a studio audience in Delaware, provided as a professional development experience for Delaware teachers and leaders. Don’t miss what Don has to say about the future of schools, innovation, and project-based learning. 

“This is as simple as doing relevant things and then taking it a little bit higher.”

~ Don Wettrick 

Don Wettrick Brings Tons of Experience to FocusED Listeners

Don Wettrick is the founder of The STARTedUP Foundation, author of Pure Genius: Building a Culture of Innovation and Taking 20% Time to the Next Level and Innovation Specialist at Noblesville High School, central IN. 

Don is known for his award-winning work as a middle school and high school teacher; educational and innovation consultant; and educational speaker.

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Thanks for listening to FocusED, an educational leadership podcast brought to you by TheSchoolHouse302 @ theschoolhouse302.com. 

FocusED is your educational leadership podcast where our mission is to dissect a particular focus for teachers and school leaders so that you can learn to lead better and grow faster in your school or district with more knowledge, better understanding, and clear direction on what to do next. 

This episode was brought to you by GhostBed, a family-owned business of sleep experts with 20+ years of experience. With 30K+ 5-star reviews, you can’t go wrong with GhostBed. Their mattresses are handcrafted, and they come with a 101-night-at-home-sleep trial. For a limited time, you can get 30% by using our code — SH302 — at checkout. And, even if you tell someone about GhostBed, you can earn a $100 referral reward. Go to Ghostbed.com today and use SH302 at checkout. 

Claim Your FREE Copy to Our Praise Practice- Practical Praise Giving Tips for Principals

Claim Your FREE Copy to Our Praise Practice- Practical Praise Giving Tips for Principals

Learn how you can give practical praise each day as you lead your school to develop a better and more positive culture through this complimentary eBook we use in our workshops to help principals all over the nation and subscribe for more resources like this one delivered to your inbox. 

Congratulations on claiming your copy - you may download it here: https://theschoolhouse302.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Technical-Tip-Praise-Practice-A-Model-for-Specific-Praise.pdf